Your skin acts like a mirror, reflecting even slight changes in your state of health.

It's especially important to take care of the skin for those who have diabetes.

Diabetes is a disease, in which your body fails to create sufficient amount of the hormone insulin or if the body's cells become resistant to it.

Insulin is normally produced by the special beta-cells of the pancreas. Owing to it, your body can convert glucose from foods into energy.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

Diabetes may be caused by autoimmune disorder (type 1) or may be a result of obesity, uncontrolled hypertension and long-term consumption of certain medications (type 2).

If this disorder stays untreated, blood glucose levels go up, while cells don't get enough energy fuel.

This can dramatically decrease blood supply of the skin and damage the nerves.

Moreover, people with any type of diabetes are more likely to experience bacterial and fungal infection than others.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

Here are the most common skin signs of extremely high blood sugar levels:

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#1. Dryness and itchiness – poor circulation and yeast infection can make your skin unbearably dry and itchy.

#2. Slow-healing sores – reduced blood supply and nerve injury can affect healing processes, causing diabetic ulcers.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#3. Diabetic dermopathy – high glucose levels affect tiny blood vessels that leads to formation of the oval or circular light-brown, scaly spots, which frequently occur on the shins. They don't cause any discomfort. That's why people often confuse diabetic dermopathy with age spots.

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#4. Necrobiosis lipoidica – it may look similar to diabetic dermopathy but be larger and deeper. Necrobiosis lipoidica begins as a red raised spot. With time these patches change their appearance and look like scars with purple edges. In contrast to dermopathy, these skin formations can open up and cause pain, itchiness, discomfort.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#5. Bullosis diabeticorum – painless blisters, which develop on the fingers, toes, hands and feet, are caused by neuropathy. They usually heal without scars within three weeks.

#6. Acanthosis nigricans – dark patches often occur in people with obesity and insulin resistance (including those who suffer from polycystic ovary syndrome). It appears in the skin folds, on the neck, groin and armpits.

#7. Granuloma annulare – arc-like red, bluish or flesh-colored rashes often happen on the ears and fingers, but can also appear on the trunk.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

#8. Digital sclerosis – poorly-controlled diabetes usually leads to skin thickness and swelling in the back of the hands. It rarely starts on the knees and elbows.

Keep your blood sugar under the control and consult with your doctor, if noticed any of these skin changes in yourself or in your beloved one.

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The BetterMe Team wants you and those close to you to live a healthy, happy life! Your health is a valuable thing; look after your body and your mind so that you can live your life to the fullest – Remember you only get one!

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