Multiple sclerosis is autoimmune disorder, which leads to permanent damage of the nervous system.

It occurs, when person's immune system begins to attack myelin sheath that normally coats nerve fibers. As a result, protective layer becomes damaged, and nerve signals can't be delivered to the brain as needed.

It is completely impossible to predict occurrence and progression of the multiple sclerosis. Symptoms can also vary in different people.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

The most common symptoms include numbness in extremities, double vision, loss of coordination and muscle weakness. People with multiple sclerosis may also complain of extreme fatigue, vertigo, bowel problems and bladder dysfunction.

In vast majority of cases disease takes relapsing-remitting course, in which appearance of new symptoms alternate with remission periods.

Sometimes symptoms may become worse gradually, without any relapses and remissions.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

Even today nobody can say exactly, why does multiple sclerosis affect some people and passes by others. However it was found that several factors can increase your risks of having this potentially disabling health condition:

#1. Age – multiple sclerosis may become apparent at any age, but in most cases it is diagnosed between 20 and 50 years old.

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#2. Being a woman – according to statistics, women are two to three times more likely to suffer from this disease than men.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#3. Race – ethnicity may play a role in your chances of having multiple sclerosis, as people of North and Western European descent are more likely to get this trouble.

#4. Genetics – like in most autoimmune diseases, having close relatives with multiple sclerosis usually means that your risks are dramatically increased.

#5. Where you lived in the childhood – sounds curious, isn't it? But that's true, those who spend first 15 years in the regions with temperate climate (like Canada, New Zealand and northern part of the United States), are in high risk of developing multiple sclerosis.

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Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#6. Infections – several studies show that certain viral infections, like mononucleosis, caused by Epstein-Barr virus, can trigger autoimmune processes in you central nervous system.

#7. Vitamin D deficiency – lack of sunlight and insufficient production of vitamin D in your body have a close link with multiple sclerosis development.

#8. Smoking – this habit can boost your risks of heart disease, bronchitis and some cancers, you know. But did you know that smokers are much more likely to have multiple sclerosis? Furthermore, smoking can speed up progression of this disorder in those, who experienced initial relapse.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#9. Other autoimmune disease – your risks of multiple sclerosis are slightly elevated, if you have type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease, thyroid problems or some other autoimmune issues.

#10. Exposure to toxins – long-term exposure to some toxic chemicals, like solvent or heavy metal, is linked with higher risks of having multiple sclerosis.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#11. Stress – emotional stress can contribute to wide variety of health problems, you know. It can be also a trigger for autoimmune processes in your body.

#12. Too much salt – one study found that excessive sodium consumption is associated with increased risks of autoimmune reaction in the body.

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The BetterMe Team wants you and those close to you to live a healthy, happy life! Your health is a valuable thing; look after your body and your mind so that you can live your life to the fullest – Remember you only get one!

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