It seems that simple flu is one of the most innocuous conditions in the world.

Each of us experienced these annoying muscle aches all over the body, chills, high fever, sore throat and extreme fatigue at least once in life.

But have you ever heard that such a well-known disease can result in heart attack? Sounds curiously, but that's true.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

Canadian researchers found that influenza can boost person's risks of heart attack sixfolds in the first week of getting acute respiratory infection, particularly influenza.

Dr. Jeff Kwong and his team looked at approximately 20 000 adults in Ontario with diagnosed and laboratory confirmed flu from 2009 to 2014.

According to data, 332 people were hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (another name for heart attack) in the course of one year after being infected with influenza. Most of these patients were seniors aged 65 and over.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

The reason is probably that older adults are much more likely to have atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and hypertension that makes them more vulnerable to heart attack, in comparison with completely healthy individuals.

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It's not clear enough, how can the flu trigger myocardial infarction.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

Specialists suppose that the platelets – special blood cells, which can stick to each other and cause clotting – become more active during infection. Increased clotting may be a culprit of the heart attack in some cases.

Sometimes people use decongestant to alleviate flu symptoms. These medicines can elevate blood pressure and heart rate that may consequently lead to heart attack, especially if you have cardiovascular disease.

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Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

That's why doctors recommend doing everything to prevent infection. Pay attention to hygiene and try to stay off infected people.

Though flu vaccination isn't able to give you 100% guarantee of effectiveness, it is a good option for those, who have heart problems, diabetes, certain chronic diseases and weak immune system. It is also recommended for pregnant women and adults older than 65 years to get vaccinated.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

Just imagine that nearly 735 000 American people experience acute myocardial infarction each year. It's completely possible to lower this number, if reducing risk factors.

And it's not about influenza. You really need to shed extra kilos, follow healthy diet, exercise and quit smoking to improve your well-being and prevent high quantity of life-threatening health issues, including heart attack.

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The BetterMe Team wants you and those close to you to live a healthy, happy life! Your health is a valuable thing; look after your body and your mind so that you can live your life to the fullest – Remember you only get one!

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