You probably know that diabetes is a disorder that keeps your blood sugar levels raised.

It may occur as autoimmune disease (type 1 diabetes), when body's immune cells begin to attack its own pancreatic cells, which normally produce hormone insulin in order to convert glucose from food into energy and transport it inside the cells.

But in vast majority of cases diabetes is associated with reduced sensitivity of the body cells to insulin (type 2 diabetes). As a result, sugar can't be moved from bloodstream into the cells.

Unfortunately, a lot of people with diabetes don't even know that the problem exists.

With time, increased blood glucose damages the vessels and nerves, leading to kidney dysfunction, loss of vision, heart disease and skin disorders.

Specialists say that skin problems may be the first warning signs of diabetes.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

Poor circulation changes skin's appearance, sensitivity and ability to sweat and to heal.

If left untreated, even minor skin disorders may turn into serious health problem.

READ MORE: 7 lifestyle changes and a diet chart to lose inches off the tummy

It's worth examining your blood glucose levels, if noticed any of these skin issues:

Credit: Pexels

Credit: Pexels

#1. Bacterial and fungal infection – infection may occur in everyone. But those, who suffer from diabetes, have really higher chances to get it, especially if disease isn't managed properly. Bacterial infection usually becomes apparent in folliculitis, sty, boils and deep skin infection, called carbuncles. Fungal infection is commonly caused by Candida albicans. It manifests in itchy red rashes with blisters and scales, situated in skin folds. Sometimes white discharge accompany these symptoms.

#2. Acanthosis nigricans – dark brown patches of raised skin may appear on the neck, groin, knees and armpits. It mainly occurs in overweight and obese individuals.

Credit: Pexels

Credit: Pexels

READ MORE: 3 banana face mask recipes for bright and clear skin

#3. Diabetic dermopathy – diabetes may affect tiny blood vessels, causing formation of light brown circular or oval spots on the skin of the calfs. These patches don't cause any discomfort, as usual. They are innocuous and can be left untreated.

#4. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum – it looks like diabetic dermopathy but spots are larger and fewer. NLD frequently starts as little red bumps, which turn into the brown itchy and painful scar-like sores. Occasionally these patches may open.

Credit: Pexels

Credit: Pexels

#5. Bullosis diabeticorum – it's not such a common condition. Diabetic blisters are similar to burn-related blisters, but they are painless and don’t cause skin redness. Bullosis is more likely to appear on extremities and heals without treatment within three weeks.

#6. Digital sclerosispoorly-managed diabetes can make your skin on the hands tight and waxy. In rare cases this disorder may affect shoulders, upper back, face, knees and feet

Credit: Pexels

Credit: Pexels

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The BetterMe Team wants you and those close to you to live a healthy, happy life! Your health is a valuable thing; look after your body and your mind so that you can live your life to the fullest – Remember you only get one!

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Credit: BetterMe