Menopause is a really significant stage of the woman's life.

It occurs, when your ovaries stop to release eggs that leads to cessation of menstruation and to loss of reproductive function.

In your mid-age, levels of sex hormones estrogen and progesterone begin to decline bit by bit. When they get extremely low, menopause eventually happens.

Not menstruating during twelve months usually means that you've already reached this phase.

In the majority of women, hormonal fluctuations cause hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings and vaginal dryness. But menopause is an individual process, so if your mother had unbearable headaches and insomnia in this period, it doesn't mean that you'll suffer from these symptoms too.

The time, when menopause comes to you, is also a big secret. Women commonly experience it between their 45 and 55 years old.

Credit: Pexels

Credit: Pexels

Once you move to menopause, annoying symptoms become less intensive and may go away at all.

However getting at this stage may have certain serious risks for your health, especially if you don't care about yourself properly. Here are the most common health issues, associated with menopause:

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Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#1. Osteoporosis – as we age, our bones become more brittle. Studies found that estrogen is involved in generating new bone cells, called osteoblasts. When amounts of this hormone drop down, bones lose their density. In addition to this, most menopausal women don't take enough bone-friendly calcium with foods. This can also increase risks of fractures. That's why taking special calcium and vitamin D-contained supplements may be recommended for some patients in the middle age. Hormone replacement therapy can also make a positive influence on your bone density.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#2. Heart disease – it seems like obesity, smoking and excessive alcohol are the main culprits of cardiovascular issues. In fact, decrease of estrogen may also shift blood cholesterol levels, boosting hazards of heart problems.

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#3. Depression – it's not about your mood swings or loss of energy at the end of a stressful day. Major depression is a psychiatric disorder, which can be triggered by menopausal hormonal changes. Furthermore, it's not uncommon that women in menopause suffer from panic attacks and chronic insomnia.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#4. Type 2 diabetes - you've probably heard that women are more likely to gain extra kilos after menopause. In this case fat tends to accumulate on the waist. This abdominal fat can be extremely harmful, as it indicates buildup of the fat around internal organs. This often results in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

#5. Urinary incontinence – in menopause, tissues of your genital area lose their elasticity and become weak. As a result, urine may be released involuntary, when you cough or laugh. To avoid incontinence, strengthen your pelvic floor muscles, performing Kegel exercises regularly. Hormone therapy is also a good option for preventing menopause-related urinary problems.

Credit: Freepik

Credit: Freepik

#6. Dementia – statistic data shows that women have higher risks of getting Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common type of dementia. Several studies show that cognitive impairment has a close link with hormonal imbalance, developed in menopause.

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The BetterMe Team wants you and those close to you to live a healthy, happy life! Your health is a valuable thing; look after your body and your mind so that you can live your life to the fullest – Remember you only get one!

Please share this with your friends and family and let us know what you think in the comments below.

Credit: BetterMe